Original

£0.32

In western Europe and America, turkish delight was often seen as a treat that must be avoided, in the minds of most Vegetarians, Vegans and Celiac sufferers. That’s because, if it’s a cheap Turkish Delight, it typically contains gelatine which vegans refuse and a variety of other ingredients (like glucose syrup) are suspect for celiac sufferers.

Description

Turkish Delight ~ a good healthy treat !
In western Europe and America, turkish delight was often seen as a treat that must be avoided, in the minds of most Vegetarians, Vegans and Celiac sufferers.
That’s because, if it’s a cheap Turkish Delight, it typically contains gelatine which vegans refuse and a variety of other ingredients (like glucose syrup) are suspect for celiac sufferers. A traditional Turkish Delight however should leave you free from those concerns. Delights such as those made by Sultan are created from only natural ingredients, they are GM Free and Gluten Free, and suitable for vegan and kosher diets. So, go ahead, treat yourself !

The Turkish names lokma and lokum are derived from the Arabic word luqma and its plural luqūm meaning “morsel” and “mouthful”
The Ottoman Turkish name, rahat-ul hulküm, was an Arabic formulation, rāḥat al-hulqūm, meaning “comfort of the throat”, which remains the name in formal Arabic.
In Libya, Saudi Arabia, and Tunisia it is known as ḥalqūm.
while in Egypt it is called malban or ʕagameyya .
Its name in various Eastern European languages comes from Ottoman Turkish lokum or rahat-ul hulküm.
Its name in Greek, λουκούμι (loukoumi) shares a similar etymology with the modern Turkish.
In parts of Cyprus, where the dessert has protected geographical indication (PGI), it is also marketed as Cyprus Delight.
In Armenian it is called lokhum (լոխում).
Its name in Bosnian is rahat lokum, and derives from a very old confusion of the two Ottoman Turkish names found already in Ottoman Turkish.
Its name in Serbo-Croat is ratluk, a reduced form of the same name. In Iran’s official language, Persian.
In English, it was formerly alternatively known as Lumps of Delight.
Fry’s Turkish Delight is marketed by Cadbury in the United Kingdom, Australia, and South Africa and can also be found in Canada and New Zealand, which is rosewater flavoured gelatine , and covered on all sides in milk chocolate. UK production controversially moved to Poland in 2010.